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male Hooded Siskin, above Mulauco, Ecuador

Paul R. Martin

Associate Professor

Paul and Brodie



Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,
Biosciences Complex, 4320
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
phone: +001-613-533-6598
fax: +001-613-533-6617

Interests:
I am an associate professor in the Department of Biology at Queen’s, interested in the origins and maintenance of diversity in nature. I use a broad array of approaches to address questions that interest me, and collaborate with many scientists in areas outside of my main research foci. All of my research is based on a deep appreciation for natural history. Much of my research takes place at the Queen’s University Biological Station (Ontario, Canada).








Graduate Students





Jaimie Bortolotti

MSc student

Jaimie and friend



Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,
Biosciences Complex, 4320
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334
fax: +001-613-533-6617
email: jaimie.bortolotti@gmail.com

Interests: My research interests include behavioural ecology and biodiversity, especially related to avian biology. Specifically, my master's thesis focuses on the interactions and communication between closely related bird species upon arrival at shared breeding grounds.   







Kevin Burke

MSc student

Kevin Burke



Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,
Biosciences Complex, 4320
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334
fax: +001-613-533-6617
email: 12kwb@queensu.ca

Interests: My research interests lie primarily in the fields of community ecology, evolutionary ecology, and entomology. My studies focus on coexisting species of Burying Beetles in the genus Nicrophorus, examining aspects of their natural histories and ecologies to better understand how closely related species coexist and how this affects the evolution of species and community structure. Specifically, my Master’s research involves identifying how species of Nicrophorus partition resources spatially through adaptation to specific habitats and environmental factors.  







Haley Kenyon

PhD student

Haley Kenyon



Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,
Biosciences Complex, 4320
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334
fax: +001-613-533-6617
email: haley.kenyon@queensu.ca

Interests: My research revolves around understanding the role that premating reproductive barriers, such as song and colour, play in speciation in birds. Most recently, my work has used a combination of song analysis, genomic analysis and playback experiments to examine song as a reproductive barrier in avian hybrid zones.   







Jill Wettlaufer

MSc student

Jill Wettlaufer



Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,
Biosciences Complex, 4320
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334
fax: +001-613-533-6617
email: 12jw73@queensu.ca

Interests: My research interests include evolutionary ecology, biodiversity, and species interactions especially among closely related species. My master’s thesis focuses on how closely related species partition resources based on spatial and temporal factors. I work with a genus of burying beetles (Nicrophorus) to identify environmental gradients (e.g. habitat, seasonality, temperature) along which different species may be differentially adapted as well as any potential evolutionary trade-offs that may maintain coexistence within this closely related genus.   









Undergraduate Students






Allison Collard

Honours thesis student

Allison



Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,
Biosciences Complex, 4320
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334
fax: +001-613-533-6617
email: 14ac28@queensu.ca

Interests: I am an undergraduate student entering the fourth year of my degree in the Department of Biology at Queen’s University. I will be spending the summer collecting data on carrion beetle populations at the Queen’s University Biological Station.  I am broadly interested in evolutionary ecology, speciation, and species interactions, and will explore these themes in my honours thesis project on carrion beetles.




Jill Sanderson

Honours thesis student

Jill Sanderson

Contact: Department of Biology, Queen’s University,
Biosciences Complex, 4320
Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7L 3N6
phone: +001-613-533-6000 ext. 77334
fax: +001-613-533-6617
email: jill.sanderson@queensu.ca

Interests: I’m an undergraduate student approaching my final year in the Department of Biology at Queen’s University. I am broadly interested in the roles of ecology and animal behaviour in maintaining diversity. More specifically, I am interested in the trade-offs that influence survival and reproduction as well as both intraspecific and interspecific interactions among individuals. Underlying my interests in research is my passion for conservation.










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