Saturated Squeezes

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Structure

In a saturated squeeze, there are effective menaces in all four suits. There are two related but distinct classes of saturated squeeze:

In either case, cashing the second last winner in the appropriate single threat squeezes a player with three stoppers, forcing the abandonment of a double threat, after which the other opponent is subjected to a simple squeeze.

As with the 1-loser triple, only positions in which all four menaces are necessary will be considered here. To see what this means in the case of the triple-simple squeeze, suppose West stops spades, hearts, and diamonds, while East stops spades and clubs. Then the ending might reduce to any of the following more basic squeezes:

Only if none of these squeezes is viable will the position qualify as a triple-simple saturated squeeze.

Similarly, in the case of a triple-triple squeeze, suppose West again stops spades, hearts, and diamonds, while East stops spades, hearts, and clubs. Then the ending might reduce to any of the following more basic squeezes:

Only if none of these squeezes is viable will the position qualify as a triple-triple saturated squeeze.

Triple-simple saturated squeezes can be regarded as simpler variants of triple-triple squeezes in which one of the double threats is actually stopped by only one opponent. Conversely, triple-triple squeezes can be regarded as augmented versions of triple-simples, in which one of the single menaces is actually stopped by both opponents. Most triple-simples correspond in this way to two (or more) triple-triples, since either single threat stopped by the player with three stoppers may be augmented to produce triple-triple (normally, one or more winners will have to be added to the other single threat against the 3-stopper hand).

Classification

As suggested by the preceding discussion, the triple-simple and triple-triple squeezes can be classified simultaneously, although this involves making some arbitrary decisions.

If one threat is alone, with the other three threats opposite, then the lone threat must be doubly recessed, since it must provide discards for two of the threats in the opposite hand. These endings are classified according to whether the lone threat is single or double.

If each hand contains two threats, then one threat in each hand must be recessed, to provide a discard for one of the two threat cards in the other hand. In the classification below, somewhat arbitrary choices have been made as to which triple-triple and triple-simple positions should be classified together; the choice made is that a triple-simple is associated with the triple-triple which results from augmenting the single threat in the same hand as the double threat; when this is not possible, the recessed single threat opposite the double threat has been augmented instead.

There are five possibilities:

  1. the packed saturated squeeze, with a doubly-recessed single threat opposite three threats, either two double threats and a single threat for the triple-triple case, or one double threat and two single threats for the triple-simple case
  2. the solitary saturated squeeze, with a doubly-recessed double threat opposite three threats, either two single threats and a double threat for the triple-triple case, or three single threats for the triple-simple case
  3. the segregated saturated squeeze, with one hand containing single threats against both opponents, opposite two double threats for the triple-triple case, or a double threat and a single threat against the 3-stopper hand for the triple-simple case
  4. the asymmetric saturated squeeze, with a non-recessed double threat in one hand, opposite a recessed double threat in the triple-triple case, or opposite two single threats stopped by the same opponent in the triple-simple case
  5. the symmetric saturated squeeze, with a recessed double threat in one hand, opposite another recessed double threat in the triple-triple case, or opposite two single threats stopped by the same opponent in the triple-simple case